Friday, 26 April 2013

Wallhalben, Germany

Of all the villes Wallhalben is the largest with a population of 798 as of December, 2011.  It is the county seat or what they call the "Rathaus" (Pronounced Rat-house) it is where all records are kept.  There are two original Cemeteries in Wallhalben.  One Jewish the other Evangelical.  There is a law in Germany that says you can be buried for 30 years.  After that you must pay an annual fee or have the body exhumed and cremated.  As you will see by the photos of the Cemetery that all headstones are new.  There is a wall separating the Jewish cemetery from the Evangelical.  The Jewish Cemetery has only a few remaining headstones.  They are so old that on some you cannot read the names.  During WW2 all the Jews were removed from the area by the Nazi's.  Out of respect for their deportation, they no longer disturb the Jewish Cemetery.  There are no Jews living in the area anymore. Frau Resch, who was helping us at the Rathaus and spoke English was very helpful.  She is one of the supervising clerks.  She made a call and got the old gentleman to open the church for us and gave us a personal tour.  The original church was built in the late 1600 to early 1700s.  That is as close as we could get.  It was destroyed and only the bell and clock tower where the weddings and christenings were done and the entrance from the main road are original.  In 1906 the church was restored using some original materials.  You can tell the new from the old.  The dark brick is the original part of the church.  The picture of mom and me standing at the alter is the original part of the church where our relatives were married and christened.  A very moving experience.  Too much to Share for just a Blog.

Crest of the Region Verbandsgemeinde-Wallhalben

This is the Church that the Rottmanns would have gone to.  You can see the original bell and clock tower from the 17th century on the right all in brick.  On the other side is the main entrance, stairs, portal and door that is also original.  The middle was restored in 1906.

Wallhaben, Germany

Wallhaben, Germany

Wallhaben, Germany

This is the church where more than likely all our German ancestors were married, christened and buried. Wallhaben, Germany

Wallhaben, Germany

Original stairs, portal and door.
Wallhaben, Germany

Wallhaben, Germany


Inside the church from the Organ pit.
Wallhaben, Germany




Behind us is the alter where one was married or christened.  This would have been the same place where Johannes Rottmann and Maria Lorentz stood when they were married in 1760.

This is Frau Resch and the old Gentleman who showed us around and gave us information regarding the  church.  They were the nicest people.  She was so kind and wanting to help..

Wallhaben, Germany

Wallhaben, Germany


Wallhaben, Germany

Wallhaben, Germany


This is the graveyard where our ancestors would have been buried.  Notice the wall surrounding the graveyard, then look at the grave stones.  The wall is over 200 years old according to Frau Resch.  The graveyard is very small.
Wallhaben, Germany


Wallhaben, Germany

Wallhaben, Germany


Jewish Graveyard, most stones were unreadable.

The last Jew buried here was 1997, See stone to the left of me. 

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